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I repeat uploading items or write ups on Garry Winogrand, who is one of my inspiration in photography.  The essence for passion in photography is defined by Winogrand.

“I am stuck with my own psychology…” Winogrand exclaimed, in one part of the interview.

And what of photography and the thing he does?  “…what ever it is, I can’t seem to do enough of it…it’s a pleasure…”

He died in March of 1984.

It was a foolish thing to do, I suppose. And the unfortunate “twinge” I felt the whole week told me so. At least the view was pretty.

—–

Ben Hogan (if you don’t know who he is, go HERE) said it best, ” Golf isn’t a game of good shots. It’s a game of bad shots”.

The last time I’d swung a golf club was 5 years ago. I’d been burned out from playing the game and swinging those beautiful clubs for the “umpteenth” time from when I started in grammar school.

As I’d remember, our father brought home some used clubs from one of his work friends one day and there we started. My brother and I just jumped in to the golf thing. I do remember the clubs were just still too long for us at that time. It was “just a bit” long for me, but it was vastly too long for my younger brother.

In those days, our family went on weekends (as outings) to our local golf ranges. If you don’t know, these were places where golf-aholics went to hit 200 or 400 golf balls out of cement cubicles, off of plastic grass blades.  Was fabulous.

And my brother and I were those people from grammar school and through high school, and when we were back from college for breaks.

Our bodies were tuned, flexible, strong, and we could hit the back end of the golf range with our drivers. We were proud of that.

But ultimately, we’d hit 200-400 golf balls with zero reciprocating resistance by our bodies. The recovery time was fantastic, as you’d imagine.

Throw down to the present and here I was swinging away like I was 5 years ago.

But one thing I forgot to do. Just forgot to stretch properly and in length. First rule was forgotten (I should have remembered. After all, I thoroughly stretch when I ride my road bike). I was just excited to be there for the first time with my girl (She was excited to hit since 3 years ago) and as mentioned, it had been a while since my last swing.

Well, anyway, I hadn’t forgotten my swing. Just a bit laziness with my back swing at top (which causes a bit of a push), but was all good. I was amazed actually. For a microsecond, I was proud.

—–

Momentary snap shot:

Below is an image I took while at that range. Was a beautiful afternoon sun reflecting off of the skyline of Manhattan (which is always at evening).

We both liked that.

Anyways, stretch well you golf ball hitting friends. Always…

And enjoy!

—–

PS:  We didn’t hit 200 golf balls. That’s for dang sure.

Image copyright mediaform jasonkim photograph

Ode to Autumn by John Keats

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run;
To bend with apples the moss’d cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease;
For Summer has o’erbrimm’d their clammy cells.

Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reap’d furrow sound asleep,
Drowsed with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twinèd flowers:
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cyder-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings, hours by hours.

Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,—
While barrèd clouds bloom the soft-dying day
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
Among the river-sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The redbreast whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.

-John Keats

All images copyright mediaform jasonkim photograph

The Witness Tree- But Outer Space (Robert Frost)

But outer Space,

At least this far,

For all the fuss

Of the populace

Stays more popular

Than populous

What is being simple?

A very basic question, don’t you think? We say this every day. From our daily routine conversations, to our business dealings at work. “Be simple, Jack!”, one says to another.

But as do many of our artist from coast to coast, “being simple” is what makes our world so complicated, sometimes.

Think about it.

What is being “simple”? And at another level, what kind of “weight” does this word/phrase carry with it, every time it’s spoken?

I think it carries, sometimes, dire controversy and/or consequences.

Besides going into all of the situations we, as human beings, say and ‘proclaim’ this attitude towards another upright walking being, I’d like to put a question to a question.

Does “being simple” dedicate and press a higher (albeit lateral) burden to a speaker?

Yes. Indeed. I believe so.

Being simple, in communication, puts higher levels of pressure upon that individual.

A simply put communication is Expected to have a complicated and detailed explanation.

Many of our discourse, in the present, do not have these together and binding. I guess many things are the public’s (you and I, all of us) fault for letting these things “go”.

Simple, does not mean “simple”. Simple is Complicated. Complicated, sometimes mean, unsophisticated and “not well thought out”.

No one’s perfect, for sure.

Lets respect the Simple… the Powerfully Simple.

Rober Frost did…

All images copyright mediaform jasonkim photograph

 

One of my heroes is Garry Winogrand.

photo by Judy Winogrand

Who?

Well, Winogrand is one of the most prolific and celebrated photographers.

He is best known as one of history’s best street photographers to ever grace our reality. His work had, in many respects, heightened our awareness on the “banality” and the “ordinary-ness” of our daily life functions.

So, what’s so special about that?

Well, his work isn’t simply impressing the point that “we function within a world where we do not really have extraordinary moments”. But he pushes the notion that WITHIN the banal, there are certainty in the extraordinary circumstances.

From the Mundane, comes brilliant excitement.

Hence, it is the opposite of dictating to us that we are forever stuck in a “gray world”, but that we live in a stupendously mysterious and extraordinary world. We live in a very lively and “alter universe”.

Winogrand’s vision of the ordinary is of like the “Bizzaro World” or the “direct opposite” of the subject and situation (as example from “Superfriends” cartoon show). The ordinary “walk” becomes an ironic and mystery to the “external” premise. The ordinary “arm toss” becomes an intrusion and a interpretive “filler” to that specific bubble world.

“A photograph is the illusion of a literal description of how the camera ‘saw’ a piece of time and space.”- Garry Winogrand.

So, if we keep with the notion of the “Superfriends Bizzaro World” concept, then the camera and the photographer are the tools to “stripping” the excess. The excess “cover” and non-continual super-glue, which kept the “reality” in tact.  Winogrand, in his philosophy, broke down that super-glue. Which directly exposed the under belly of that moment. That dirty and more interesting moment.

Winogrand’s inspired many (just like me) in what photography is all about. He (and many before him, and his contemporaries, plus his direct and indirect disciples) put the essence in the forefront. He’s put what photography can do and what it inspires to do (but often fails).

“There is a transformation. By putting 4 edges around, it changes it (i.e. the banality & of the mundane of life).”- Garry Winogrand.

This is where I’d decided on the name of my blog. Just like Winogrand, I think of photography as like lifting a large rock after a spring rain fall. You get to expose the life and the more interesting life events existing together for survival.  Life doesn’t get better or worse with looking at photography like this. Which is what Winogrand philosophises. He’s not guaranteeing anything. He just states that the camera (exposing the subject) imposes a different reality.

And that is the point. There’s no better or worse. There’s just the way the camera and the photographer ‘made’ that moment.

He’s a hero of mine, and in some very small way, I make my blog as a tribute to his art and his genius.  Garry Winogrand is a grand master of photography. Will alway be, to me.

So, I’ll always will try to expose or get a glimpse of that sometimes deceptively slippery under-belly.

Jason

“An ode to a summer” (and end of 2011 version, if you will)

You came to me with the most delightful curtsey.

“Hello” you said. I said, “Hi, we meet again.”

We exchanged pleasantries, with the utmost respect.

I was sure we’d click, as if you were Josie Bissett.

I told myself you weren’t quite ‘Melrose Place‘, but I wasn’t sure.

Through your tactful taunting and bellowing, you brought the sun-  your friend and partner.

I scratched my head in disbelief, but with awe.

‘Summer, you are such a sunshine in my eyes’.  And you answered, ‘I know’

Ok. We quietly sat, until October. Me, still scratching my head about ‘Melrose Place’, and you looking to go to Argentina.

>> NOTE: I don’t pretend to be a poet. Never. Well, unless something silly like this, and for some ‘girlfriend’ situations…  But I know you’ll appreciate my horrible attempt at some kind of poetry LOL <<

———–

Oh and the pics below are from Belmar, NJ. Had some good relaxing time there this year. We’ll return again, next year!

Hope you all had a great stretch of summer, as well!

All images copyright mediaform jasonkim photograph

I carry my camera almost every time I leave my apartment. My favorite camera depends on my mood (makes a big difference) and what kind of photographs I believe I want to take in that outing (this day I had my DSLR with me with my trusty 50mm).

It’s a philosophy (a philosophy many photogs dwell) and a habit which has been drilled in. It’s like when you don’t have your wrist watch on (for those of you who always are used to wearing them). Just feels like something’s missing.

Anyway, yesterday (on my way to Newark) it was one of those days I was very glad to have my camera with me. And it isn’t because there was an abundant amount of subjects I particularly wanted to take images of, but that I would have been very bored.

The photos you see below are ones taken from a very, very, very long traffic halt. It wasn’t overly unpleasant, but I did thank my lucky stars I went to the bathroom prior. It was that long.

See, the images don’t have to have spectacular weight (at least in personal/fun mode). As you can see, these are just items you’d see behind any traffic: barriers, rails, trucks, trailers, tires, bumpers, inside of my car, sky, etc.

But it’s a rolling story. It’s not a very compelling story, but it is a story- snapped & communicated within a 5 image frame. Nothing complicated but a total personal moment in time, explained in ‘paragraphs’, within the 5. No more, no less (because it’s my story). Not clear always mind you. However, we photogs always try our best. =D

Oh, by the last image of the sky, is when I lifted my head up to say to myself, “Finally!”

Then I was on my way to Newark. The Brick City!

Fun, isn’t it? Yep. I agree.

AAll images copyright mediaform jasonkim photograph

As human beings, I think we love thing from “higher up”. I mean views of view points that give us a glimpse of how birds look at our world every day. I think we humans are very jealous =D

We are, after all, terrestrial beings. Animals that have occupied the dry lands (as temporary Inn keepers) for a time, expanding, spreading, cultivating, devastating, and at the same time innovating.

But just like the Wright brothers (and countless other humans), who just wanted to be flying like birds, we terrestrial beings just aren’t satisfied with the view which we have.

That’s why we have persons and groups that love traveling to the tops of the highest mountains, tops of the highest buildings, flying in dare devil planes, and flying out (trying hard) towards the vast cosmos.

Of course, we all do not carry such “first person” ambitions for adventure, but we all do sometimes profess the odd, “ohhs”, and “ahhs”, when we see photographs and videos showing us the seldom bird’s eye view.

Most of us (and this is my inkling) love the Discovery Channel, Science Channel, National Geographic Channel, and so forth. This is because, in the safety of our sofas, we can enjoy and get a “glimpse” of how birds always see the world. Or we love those big zoom perspectives of the Himalayas, or Mount Kilimanjaro from our ant’s view, because the magnitude and scale of those colossal leviathans in wide angle is “unimaginable”.

Yep. We as species appreciate nature’s giants. Structures that make us go, whoa!

As for me, I’d love to be able to fly like a bird. That would be just fab!

All images copyright mediaform jasonkim photograph

When I start on a street photography trek, I start with a notion.  That’s just me saying to myself, “What idea I’d like to photograph today”.  It’s not a very structured start of the trek.

However, it is a ritual that I do.

From that kernel, the logistics of the trek can be developed (albeit very quickly and sometimes haphazardly). Well, it’s a process.

Anyways, I digress.

What I was about to say is that coupled with the excitement of not clearly knowing what one will encounter in the streets, the notion of ‘speculating’ about what your subject is thinking about in their individual heads it, equally intriguing.

And any photo of any individual in the streets can mandate such feelings from you, the photographer.

This is what is so exciting about street photography.  Like Forest Gum, “…you never know what you gonna get…”

Here in this example, the subjects are getting out of St. Paul’s Chapel on Trinity.

The subjects are tourists, as you can imagine. They have come to ground zero to take part in the ritual of visitation. I don’t know whether these subjects are residents from the US, or from another country, but the act of visitation has the similar motive.

Now, what do these visitors think of when they approach, and visit such a place. I guess this is where we can interject and insert our own guessed narratives to mold a story. It’s all fiction, you see, but this is a major part of the fun.

So, the simple first question would be:  “What were these ladies coming out of the church thinking about, at that second (when I pressed my shutter button)?”

“Was this lady thinking about the nobleness of the structure? Or was she thinking about her next month’s rent bills?”

“Was the other lady not happy with the visit? What are they looking and feeling as they climbed down those respected steps?”

See? It’s fun, ain’t it? I smile always when I deem there’s a story within the brains of those subjects. It’s a part of the process that is precious for the “fun”.

It’s all good.

Image copyright mediaform jasonkim photograph

As I’m listening to Ambrosia and working on my projects, I reflect (just a little) on the world of photography.

Some things in life, I’ve often just pressed passed it- as an issue and/or as subject.

One thing for sure, is that I will try my best to seek and recognize the little things that cross my path or my flight (hence my tact on the title of my photo blog “The Mundane”).

Well, just as in principle and on going pillar of street photography, I couple that notion- building and learning (always learning) about the world (small and large) around you and I.

In street photography, it’s a mish-mash of all the major categories of disciplines. It’s sometimes portrait, sometimes landscape, sometimes journalistic, and sometimes all at the same time.

It’s just a beautiful thing. There’s a reason why so many of us, fans of the art of photography, are enamoured with it.  Street photography is so “Open” in its entry, input, interpretation, output. But it’s, in some angles, a rigid skill. It’s “Closed”.

Don’t worry, lets not all think it’s so academic.  Opinions differ in its ultimate relevance in the technical landscape. But to me it’s a learning tablet and a fun factory. There’s not many things that make me have a small smirk (in happiness) when roaming and snapping.

Anywho, that’s one rant for now. Hope your weekends are going fab!

All images copyright mediaform jasonkim photograph

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